Helpful Online Dharma Resources During This Time of Pandemic

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Poems:

PANDEMIC
by Joseph Goldstein
Sheltered and safe
when others are not,
fed and nourished
when others are not.
How to live
in such a world
alone and connected
at the same time?Facing forward
stepping back,
do we turn away
or look beyond ourselves
as we choreograph this dance
of fear and love?

Love in the time of Covid-19

When you go out

and see the empty streets,

the empty stadiums,

the empty train platforms,

don’t say to yourself: It looks like the end of the world.

What you’re seeing is Love in action.

What you’re seeing in that negative space

is how much we do care for each other.

For our grandparents,

For our immune-compromised brothers and sisters,

For people we will never meet.

People will lose their jobs over this,

Some will lose their businesses,

And some will lose their lives.

All the more reason to take a moment,

When you’re out on your walk,

Or on your way to the store,

Or just watching the news,

To look into the emptiness

and marvel at all that Love.

Let it fill you and sustain you.

It is not the end of the world.

It is the most remarkable act of global solidarity

We may ever witness.

-Anonymous


Poem by Kitty O’Meara:

And the people stayed home. And read books, and listened, and rested, and exercised, and made art, and played games, and learned new ways of being, and were still. And listened more deeply. Some meditated, some prayed, some danced. Some met their shadows. And the people began to think differently.

And the people healed. And, in the absence of people living in ignorant, dangerous, mindless, and heartless ways, the earth began to heal.

And when the danger passed, and the people joined together again, they grieved their losses, and made new choices, and dreamed new images, and created new ways to live and heal the earth fully, as they had been healed.


Lynn Ungar’s poem Pandemic:

What if you thought of it
as the Jews consider the Sabbath—
the most sacred of times?
Cease from travel.
Cease from buying and selling.
Give up, just for now,
on trying to make the world
different than it is.
Sing. Pray. Touch only those
to whom you commit your life.
Center down.

And when your body has become still,
reach out with your heart.
Know that we are connected
in ways that are terrifying and beautiful.
(You could hardly deny it now.)
Know that our lives
are in one another’s hands.
(Surely, that has come clear.)
Do not reach out your hands.
Reach out your heart.
Reach out your words.
Reach out all the tendrils
of compassion that move, invisibly,
where we cannot touch.

Promise this world your love–
for better or for worse,
in sickness and in health,
so long as we all shall live.

Lynn Ungar 3/11/20